Month: January 2018

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A new superconducting switch could soon enable computers to make decisions very similarly to the way we do, essentially turning them into artificial brains. One day, this new technology could underpin advanced artificial intelligence (AI) systems that may become part of our everyday life, from transportation to medicine.   Researchers at the US National Institute
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For years, researchers have known that carbon, when arranged in a certain way, can be very strong. Case in point: graphene. Graphene, which was heretofore, the strongest material known to man, is made from an extremely thin sheet of carbon atoms arranged in two dimensions.   But there’s one drawback: while notable for its thinness and unique
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Does your pooch eat poo? If it’s any consolation, he’s in extremely good company. In a new paper, veterinary researchers at University of California at Davis who surveyed thousands of dog owners found 16 percent of pups consume other canines’ faeces “frequently,” having been spotted doing it more than six times by their owners.  
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When something explodes, you expect there to be a bright flash that subsides. This is what astrophysicists thought would happen when they observed the collision between two neutron stars last August – but contrary to expectations, it’s still continuing to brighten months after the event, leaving scientists stunned.   According to data from NASA’s Chandra
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After 10 months of intensive exploration, scientists in Mexico have discovered the world’s largest flooded cave system – and it’s truly an underwater wonderland. Spanning an incredible 347 kilometres (216 miles) of subterranean caverns, this branching, sunken labyrinth isn’t just a natural spectacle – it’s also an important archaeological find that could reveal lost secrets of
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Isn’t it beautiful? This is an illustrated logarithmic scale conception of the observable Universe with the Solar System at the centre. Encircling the Solar System are the inner and outer planets, Kuiper belt, Oort cloud, Alpha Centauri star, Perseus Arm, Milky Way galaxy, Andromeda galaxy, other nearby galaxies, the cosmic web, cosmic microwave radiation, and invisible
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Over the past two decades, the positive psychology movement has brightened up psychological research with its science of happiness, human potential and flourishing. It argues that psychologists should not only investigate mental illness but also what makes life worth living.   The founding father of positive psychology, Martin Seligman, describes happiness as experiencing frequent positive